SharePoint LMS: The Bad and the Ugly

I’ve indicated that I was overall happy with this product, but that’s not to say there aren’t things that could really improve it and take it to the next level.  For anyone considering deploying SharePoint LMS – here are some things to be aware of :

The gradebook – not all it’s cracked up to be

I had two major issues with the gradebook. The major one was that when we added over 500 users, the gradebook came to a grinding halt. Whenever one of us accessed the gradebook – it simply failed to respond. When we had only 20 users it worked fine. It seemed to be a huge resource hog and would shoot our server memory up to 2GB and cause huge processor spikes. When this would happen, sometimes a page would load, sometimes not. Often the entire site stopped working for all of us because one person accessed the gradebook. Therefore we had to get rid of it because it had huge performance implications.

The second issue was more of a subjective issue – but it doesn’t really seem that useful for the end user. It uses a horizontal way to display the information which makes it not that easy on the eye. There’s also no way to really customize how it looks for students. Ultimately we abandoned it and added a way for users to see their attempts and scores on the course landing pages.

You can’t add HTML in a lot of places

It takes a few clicks for a user to get to their lessons. For example:

  1. Click to get to your course
  2. Click to enter your learning path
  3. Click to confirm you want to start the learning path
  4. Click to start the lesson

Now this is not an unreasonable number of steps to get to a lesson. However, to an end user who may not be aware of what a learning path vs lesson is – this may seem a bit confusing. We were able to use SharePoint designer as well as some of the menus to add some text explaining this, but it would be nice to have menu options to fill information at each of these stages.

Double sets of buttons

SharePoint by default has double sets of buttons. This is so that if you have a long list, you don’t have to scroll to the top or bottom to find the buttons. However, in some cases the LMS has these double sets of buttons with only one line of text in between them. If we were able to add some HTML in between the buttons it would make it a bit more attractive, but for the end user, it looked awkward from time to time.

While within a course – the full list of courses does not display

When you are at the root of the LMS, you can see a list of all available courses on the quick launch. Unfortunately when you drill into a course (which is really a sub-site) the course item on the quick launch remains, yet it’s empty. This creates a menu option with no content. We couldn’t figure out how to turn this off. It would be nice if we were able to get it to fully populate.

Delineating between attempts of a learning path and attempts of a SCORM

This really got us confused. When a user is moving through the learning path, there are a series of screens identifying where there is a new or existing attempt. However, the default language doesn’t reflect that in the LMS.  We found ourselves starting attempt 2, and then starting attempt 4 and not understanding how the LMS was counting. Ultimately we discovered that it was attempt #2 of the learning path and attempt #4 of the SCORM. We added some cues to explain this to users as they worked through the learning path.

Unable to get to full SCORM data

When a user finishes a SCORM, they get a full summary of their activities. It’s the type of stuff that is most useful for evaluation of your training.  It tells them what they answered, what questions they did well on, what questions they had to answer more than once, how much time they spent etc. Unfortunately when you run reports on activity, you aren’t able to access the granular data. We also could not find the data and so therefore couldn’t pull it into a list or out of the database L

Reporting wishes –  why are they only cumulative

The reports are always cumulative. We wanted to provide a report over a specific period of time. We devised a way to pull regular reports and then calculate the difference between the current report and the previous one to determine activity – but that’s a round-about way of doing things.

I wish the reports had some advanced charting

We really would have liked to have some pie-charts, bar graphs, etc for the reporting. It produced a concise table with information, but when showing these things to the client – it’s always better to have some graphics that can be generated automatically. A reporting panel would be great.
Controlling where a user lands at the end of a learning path

At the end of a learning path or at the end of a lesson, a user always lands on the respective allitems.aspx page. The problem is that this page doesn’t really fit within a web-site and is more of a page that makes sense in SharePoint. As a result, we used SharePoint designer to customize these pages so that they looked like they were part of the navigation.

Control over the quick launch area that lists the elements of the learning path

It’s great that the LMS lists all of the elements of your learning path as well as your progress. It does this in the quick launch. However, the quick launch is always fairly short and cannot support long amounts of text. To address this the LMS allows scrolling, but it looks awkward. The result is a horizontal scroll bar in the middle of the quick launch that seems out of place. If nothing else – this text should wrap and perhaps be bulleted so that it can be clearly viewed.

The language files are cumbersome
You might not be too happy with the default language in the LMS. We wanted to change things like the words attempt and how it displayed attempts. It was initially grammatically wrong … it would say :

  1. You are about to start 1 attempt
  2. You are about to start 2 attempt
  3. You are about to start 3 attempt

We were able to change this – but it’s literally like searching for a needle in a hay stack.  Furthermore, one we opened the language files, we realized that text was re-used in multiple places. So you might change congratulatory text yet realize it’s used to congratulate people for 3 different scenarios. Without a manual for the language files, it was quite tedious to customize it. This LMS could benefit from a control panel for managing these things or if nothing else… a manual for the language files!

Migrating user scores – ain’t so easy

We needed to migrate scores for users into the LMS. There was no way to do this with an import feature. We also couldn’t go in and “set” scores or award certificates for users. This presents a large problem when migrating a large number of users into this LMS.

Last Thoughts

We were able to overcome pretty much everything listed here. However, the fact that they needed to be overcome is what was frustrating. Ultimately, I do like this product. There are things that work great and other things that are strangely challenging. With some custom development and use of SharePoint designer, you can do quite a bit to make this your own.

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